Read ✓ Storm of Steel By Ernst Jünger – Playutopia.us

Storm of Steel A Memoir Of Astonishing Power, Savagery And Ashen Lyricism, Storm Of Steel Depicts Ernst J Nger S Experience Of Combat In The German Front Line Leading Raiding Parties, Defending Trenches Against Murderous British Incursions, And Simply Enduring As Shells Tore His Comrades Apart One Of The Greatest Books To Emerge From The Catastrophe Of The First World War, It Illuminates Like No Other Work Not Only The Horrors But Also The Fascination Of A War That Made Men Keep Fighting On For Four Long Years.

Read ✓ Storm of Steel  By Ernst Jünger – Playutopia.us
  • Paperback
  • Storm of Steel
  • Ernst Jünger
  • English
  • 23 November 2019
  • 0143571842

    10 thoughts on “Read ✓ Storm of Steel By Ernst Jünger – Playutopia.us


  1. says:

    I have often lamented the lack of German World War I perspectives Erich Maria Remarque aside, I usually read works by British and French scholars, memoirists, diarists, and novelists Fortunately here is a fine memoir translated from the German by the esteemed Michael Hofmann I like its very flat spare prose Everything is simply allowed to stand for itself bravery, death, corpses, blood, shrapnel, friendship, dreams Plainly declarative, there is no unnecessary coloration, no prolixity, no s I have often lamented the lack of German World War I perspectives Erich Maria Remarque aside, I usually read works by British and French scholars, memoirists, diarists, and novelists Fortunately here is a fine memoir translated from the German by the esteemed Michael Hofmann I like its very flat spare prose Everything is simply allowed to stand for itself bravery, death, corpses, blood, shrapnel, friendship, dreams Plainly declarative, there is no unnecessary coloration, no prolixity, no subtext, little in the way of moral judgement After reading Robert Graves s Goodbye to ...


  2. says:

    Ernst J nger is an insurance actuary s worst nightmare he smoked, drank, experimented with drugs, served in two world wars, sustained multiple injuries, and yet died only one month shy of 103 And his exploits on the front You couldn t make this stuff up I confess to not knowing many Germans, but the national stereotypes organized, efficient, not a lot of laughs werethan born out in his memoir.One of the things that struck me the most about the book was how different it was from Brit Ernst J nger is an insurance actuary s worst nightmare he smoked, drank, experimented with drugs, served in two world wars, sustained multiple injuries, and yet died only one month shy of 103 And his exploits on the front You couldn t make this stuff up I confess to not knowing many Germans, but the national stereotypes organized, efficient, not a lot of laughs werethan born out in his memoir.One of the things that struck me the most about the book was h...


  3. says:

    Expecting a Marinetti like vociferation, an avant garde hymn to mechanical war, I initially found J nger s narrative a little flat In The Great War and Modern Memory Paul Fussell makes J nger sound entertainingly gauche, a gas goggled steampunk berserker with a will to power prose style I was bored by the 100 pages preceding chapter 7, Guillemont, whose evocation of the Battle of the Somme finally hooked me A runner from a W rttemberg regiment reported to me to guide my platoon t...


  4. says:

    This is probably the cheeriest war memoir ever While J nger occasionally remembers to throw in the the requisite oh the horrors of war comment, most of the time it is clear he is having a blast Based on his other hobbies travel, hunting, joining the French Foreign Legion, dangerous political conversation, taking all available dr...


  5. says:

    An oddly jaunty memoir of the Western Front, characterised by what J nger describes somewhere as his strange mood of melancholy exultation I am surprised so many people have found his prose clean , sparse , unemotional I thought the opposite, that it was rather over literary in many places not overwritten exactly, but with touches of a grand Romantic sensibility that I haven t found in English or French writers of the First World War The white ball of a shrapnel shell melted far off, s An oddly jaunty memoir of the Western Front, characterised by what J nger describes somewhere as his strange mood of melancholy exultation I am surprised so many people have f...


  6. says:

    War means the destruction of the enemy without scruple and by any means War is the harshest of all trades, and the masters of it can only entertain humane feelings so long as they do no harm. Ernst J nger was a born soldier neither risk averse nor foolhardy, able to command the loyalty of others and to follow orders without question, able to fight withou...


  7. says:

    I couldn t help associating this WWI memoir with what I ve read recently, particularly Speedboat and Sleepless Nights, that wouldn t seem related at all on the surface but definitely shared a sense of fragmented cohesion, or cohesive fragmentation This one and those two novels by late 70s NYC intellectual women offer minimal to zero plot and characterization but excel thanks to unique voice, setting, and perception vibe Storms of Steel is just as fractured as Speedboat, with just as many fl I couldn t help associating this WWI memoir with what I ve read recently, particularly Speedboat and Sleepless Nights, that wouldn t seem related at all on the surface but definitely shared a sense of fragmented cohesion, or cohesive fragmentation This one and those two novels by late 70s NYC intellectual women offer minimal to zero plot and characterization but excel thanks to unique voice, setting, and perception vibe Storms of Steel is just as fractured as Speedboat, with just as many fleeting human encounters but this is differentiated of course by the ever present possibility of a bullet in the eye, shrapnel severing an essential artery, excessive inhalation of chlorine gas, on and on Also, as far as I know, Rena...


  8. says:

    Beautifully written Junger has extraordinary gifts as a writer The one thing that makes it harder to connect with his accounts was his cool detachment in his presentation of events and experiences Beneath the surface is a bit of soft nationalism which is obnoxious but not completely blind or extreme, at least not as blind or extreme as one would expect from a French or German citizen soldier who was constantly indoctrinated with this nationalistic state propaganda of the times It really is p Beautifully written Junger has extraordinary gifts as a writer The one thing that makes it harder to connect with his accounts was his cool detachment in his presentation of events and experiences Beneath the surface is a bit of soft nationalism which is obnoxious but not completely blind or extreme, at least not as blind or extreme as one would expect from a French or German citizen soldier who was constantly indoctrinated with this nationalistic state propaganda of the times It really is pretty much unavoidable in this time period except for a small sliver of exceptional individuals who somehow managed to defy this conformity to nationalism of which there are examples in all of the WWI countries I don t mean to be unfair by judging Junger via the prism of our contemporary standard...


  9. says:

    This has to be the best bit of WW1 writing I ve experienced so far I ve often maintained that the Great War was the last major conflict in which the combatants regarded the foe with a certain amount of respect and chivalrous conduct They were equals at arms, with neither side having an ungodly edge in technology, as we see today Junger was typical of young officers of the time, whether they wore the grey or khaki he was keen to fight, and did so energetically His aggressive nature can be de This has to be the best bit of WW1 writing I ve experienced so far I ve often maintained that the Great War was the last major conflict in which the combatants regarded the foe with a certain amount of respect and chivalrou...


  10. says:

    Ernst Junger s memoir of his time on the Western Front 1914 1918 is a powerful glimpse at what it s like to be a soldier, made all thepowerful because it s unadorned with philosophical introspection or politics The reader joins Junger as he joins his unit in Champagne and leaves him during his final convalescence in a Hanover hospital In betw...

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